Gabriella Alvarez

Packard Student-Junior  

Lab Group: Ted Holman Lab

Major: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Investigating the Role of pi-pi Interactions within the Active Site of 12-Lipoxygenase. Gabriella Alvarez, Ansari Aleem, Wan-Chen Tsai, and Ted Holman, Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz 8th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017


Selene Banuelos 

Packard Student-Senior (5th)

Lab Group: Kellogg Lab

Major: Molecular, Cell, & Developmental Biology 

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Elm1 regulates PP2ARts1  a Key Player in Cell Size Control in Budding Yeast. Selene Banuelos, Maria Alcaide, Kate Schuber, and Doug Kellogg, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz 8th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation 

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017


Kevin Ekanem

Packard- Junior

Lab Group: Grant Hartzog

Major: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 

Research: 

Bacteriophage, viruses that infect bacteria, are the most numerous organisms and one of the greatest sources of genetic diversity on the planet. With greater than 1000 sequenced genomes available, mycobacteriophage, which infect mycobacteria, are the best-characterized class of bacteriophages. Comparison of these genomes has shown that each mycobacteriophage is unique and that the mycobacteriophages frequently exchange small portions of their genomes with their hosts and other mycobacteriophage. This extensive exchange prevents construction of conventional phylogenies but mycobacteriophage with similar genomic structures can be grouped in one of 27 clusters. We are studying Violet; a mycobacteriophage isolated at UCSC that is a member of cluster A1. Interestingly, gp57 of Violet is encoded by a 1.5kb nucleotide sequence that appears to be completely unique to the A1 cluster. A BLASTx search showed that this sequence has the potential to encode protein in two different reading frames. The first appears to encode a protein whose N- and C-termini resemble a DNA methyltransferase and whose central region is unique. The second reading frame, which roughly overlaps the unique domain in the first open reading frame, encodes an HNH nuclease. Interestingly, mass-spectrometry of phage Violet suggests that both reading frames are expressed. We will discuss hypotheses and strategies to explain the genesis and functions of this interesting gene.

Internships/Presentations/Awards:

Protein Expression from Overlapping Reading Frames of Mycobacteriophage Violet. Kevin Ekanem and Grant Hartzog, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz 8th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation 

Protein Expression from Overlapping Reading Frames od Mycobacteriophage Violet. Keving Ekanem and Grant Hartzog, University of California, Santa Cruz, 7th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2016. Poster Presentation

Comparative Genomics of Cluster O Mycobacteriophages. PLoS ONE 10(3). 2015. Publication.

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Koret Undergraduate Research Scholarship Recipient 2017

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017

Summer Research Experience 2016, University of California Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2016
 

Joel Flores

Packard Student-Senior

Lab Group: Chris Vollmers' Lab

Major: Human Biology

Research: 

The adaptive immune system protects from pathogens.

The two main components of the adaptive immune system are B cells and T cells which work together to produce antibodies needed to fight of foreign substances in the human body. Both B cells and T cells undergo the process of VDJ recombination that gives each cell a unique receptor to bind to specific pathogens.  This process of recombination is what makes B and T cells fascinating to study since it’s the recombination of only two cell types which give rise to a multitude of antibodies. Vollmers lab has developed assay to sequence unique B cell receptors. My research in Vollmers lab will be to adapt this assay to be able to sequence T cell receptors. This will make it possible to get a complete view of the receptors of the adaptive immune system and further understand how they work together.

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Testing for Various Polymerases. Joel Flores, Camille Scelfo-Dalbey, Christopher Vollmers. University of California, Santa Cruz. 7th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2016. Poster Presentation.

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Summer Research Experience 2016, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2016


 

Jorge Martinez-Gonzalez 

Packard Student-Senior 

Lab Group: Mascharak Lab

Major: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

 

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Summer Research Experience 2016, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2016


 

Cynthia Moncada 

Packard Student-Senior 

Lab Group: 

Major: Neuroscience

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

 

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017


Andrea Ramirez 

Packard Student-Senior 

Lab Group: 

Major: Molecular, Cell, & Developmental Biology 

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Expressing HIS5 in Yeast Through Exon Skipping. Andrea Ramirez, Kennedy Allen, and Grant Hartzog, Molecular, Cell, and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, 8th Annual Physical and Biological Science Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation

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Summer Research Insistution 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017


Dayana Sandoval 

Packard Student-Senior

Lab Group: Ted Holman Lab

Major: Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Subcerebral Neuronal Fate Specification in the Developing Cerebral Cortex. Dayana Sandoval, Jeremiah Tsyporin, and Bin Chen, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, 8th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017


Jesus Serrano

Packard Student-Junior

Lab Group: SCIPP

Major: Astrophysics

Research: 
 
In 2012 the Higgs boson was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Measurements of the Higgs boson's mass and couplings to other particles are now a high priority for particle physicists. In particular, deviations from the expected couplings would appear as changes to the Higgs cross-section. It is therefore important to analyze the cross sections in terms of the coupling parameters. In this study, Higgs production rates in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions were calculated with a Monte Carlo-based program and event generator named VBFNLO. The dependence on the Higgs couplings to top quarks, bottom quarks, and vector bosons was parameterized with a polynomial fit. Because boosted Higgs production is expected to result in a cleaner signature for precision measurements, the fits were performed in both inclusive and boosted samples. Overall, these fits manifest the clear relations between the Higgs cross section and the couplings of the fundamental particles. Precision measurements that use this technique will require larger data sets. Larger samples can be obtained by colliding more intense beams in the LHC. The proposed HL-LHC (High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider) will feature 5-7 times more intense proton beams than the current LHC. The production of additional particles will require an upgraded pixel detector system containing smaller pixels. To read out the increased data set will require higher frequency of data transmission rates, up to 5 Gbps. The wires that will be utilized to transmit this data must fulfill several criteria in order to be utilized in the pixel detector system; these include: high radiation tolerance and low mass. Thus tests were made on a hybrid set of data transmission wires at low voltage. Bit Error Rates (BER) were measured based on the length of Pseudo-Random-Bit-Sequence (PRBS) being used and the type of signal conditioning being applied on the wires.

Internships/ Presentations/ Awards:

Higgs Boson Production Rates and Data Transmission Upgrades For the ATLAS Experiments at the LHC. Jesus Javier Serrano and Jason Nielson. Long Beach, CA. Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) Conference, 2016. Poster Presentation. 

Higgs Boson Production Rates and Data Transmission Upgrades For the ATLAS Experiments at the LHC. Jesus Javier Serrano and Jason Nielson. University of Californa, Santa Cruz, 7th Annual Physical and Biological Sciences Summer Research Symposioum, 2016. Poster Presentation.

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2017 CAMP symposium Physical Sciences poster presentation medal

2017 Hack UCSC hack against cyber-bullying award 

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Summer Research Experience 2016, University of California-Santa Cruz. Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2016
 


Marden Zelaya 

Packard Student-Junior 

Lab Group: Bhalla Lab

Major: Human Biology

Research: 

Presentations/Awards/Internships:

Is DNA Damage Response in C. elegans Inhibited by Defects in Crossover Recombination? Marden Zelaya, Kevin Hagy, and Needhi Bhalla, Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz, 8th Annual Physical and Biological Summer Research Symposium, 2017. Poster Presentation

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Summer Research Experience 2017, University of California-Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA. Summer 2017.


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